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Morphology and Function of the Aortic Valve after Transcatheter Closure of Ventricular Septal Defect with Aortic Valve Prolapse

Wenqian Zhang1,2,#, Chaojie Wang1,3,#, Lingmei Zhou2,4,#, Junjie Li2, Jijun Shi2, Yumei Xie2, Mingyang Qian2, Shushui Wang2, Zhiwei Zhang1,2,*
1 Graduate School, The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
2 Department of Cardiac Pediatrics, Guangdong Provincial Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China
3 Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China
4 School of Medicine, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
* Corresponding Author: Zhiwei Zhang. Email:
# All three authors contributed equally to this article

Congenital Heart Disease 2021, 16(5), 519-528. https://doi.org/10.32604/CHD.2021.015527

Received 25 December 2020; Accepted 10 March 2021; Issue published 03 June 2021

Abstract

Objective: This study aims to evaluate the morphology and function of the aortic valve after transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defect (VSD) with aortic valve prolapse (AVP) abased on clinical and radiological outcomes. Methods: From January 2013 to November 2014, 164 consecutive patients (97 males, 59.1%) with VSD and AVP were treated by transcatheter closure. The patients were divided into the mild AVP group (n = 63), moderate AVP group (n = 89) and severe AVP group (n = 12). The clinical and radiological outcomes of these patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In total, 146 (89.0%) patients were successfully treated with VSD occluders, including 59/63 (93.7%) with mild AVP, 80/89 (89.9%) with moderate AVP and 7/12 (58.3%) with severe AVP. The degree of AVP was ameliorated or disappeared in 39 (26.7%) patients, and remained unchanged in 103 (70.5%) patients after the intervention. In the 35 patients who initially had trivial-to-moderate aortic regurgitation (AR), the degree of AR was ameliorated or disappeared in 25 (71.4%) patients, aggravated from trivial to mild AR in 1 (2.9%) patient, and remained unchanged in 9 (25.7%) patients. In 111 patients without AR, 1 (0.9%) patient had mild AR and 24 (21.6%) patients had trivial AR after intervention. The depth and width of the prolapsed aortic valve decreased after transcatheter closure of VSD in all three groups. During the 70-month (range, 54–77) follow-up period, no patients with AVP and AR needed an aortic valve intervention. Conclusions: Transcatheter closure of VSD with AVP is feasible. The morphology and function of the prolapsed aortic valve improved and remained stable for a long period after intervention.

Keywords

Ventricular septal defect; aortic valve prolapse; aortic regurgitation

Cite This Article

Zhang, W., Wang, C., Zhou, L., Li, J., Shi, J. et al. (2021). Morphology and Function of the Aortic Valve after Transcatheter Closure of Ventricular Septal Defect with Aortic Valve Prolapse. Congenital Heart Disease, 16(5), 519–528.



This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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