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Surgical Correction of Coronary Artery Ectasia Combining Congenital Coronary Artery Fistula

Yulin Wang1,#, Ye Yang1,#, Limin Xia1,3, Wenjun Ding1, Qiang Ji1,*, Chunsheng Wang2,*
1 Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, Shanghai, China
2 Shanghai Municipal Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Shanghai, China
3 Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of Xiamen Branch of Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, Xiamen, China
* Corresponding Authors: Qiang Ji. Email: ; Chunsheng Wang. Email:
# Yulin Wang and Ye Yang: Contributed equally as the co-first author

Congenital Heart Disease 2021, 16(1), 95-106. https://doi.org/10.32604/CHD.2021.014276

Received 15 September 2020; Accepted 12 October 2020; Issue published 23 December 2020

Abstract

Background: Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) complicated with concomitant congenital coronary artery fistula (CCAF) is rare. This study characterizes the clinical characteristics of CAE combining CCAF, and reports a single-institution experience with surgical correction of CAE combining CCAF. Methods: A total of 24 symptomatic patients (8 males, median 52.5 years old) who underwent surgical correction of CAE combining CCAF in this center were reviewed. Based on the size of ectatic segment, the CAE were classified as a giant CAE (>20 mm, n = 14) and a non-giant CAE (≤20 mm, n = 10). Individualized surgical approaches were chosen. The patients were followed up for a median of 3.8 years. Results: The overwhelming majority of CAEs were solitary, and only 4.2% of CAEs were associated with multiple lesions. CAEs were predominantly located in the right coronary artery with predilection to women more than to men (2:1). 95.8% of patients with the CCAF had single fistula defect. The right atrium was the most frequent drainage site (33.3%) followed by the left ventricle (25.0%). Surgical mortality was 4.2%. All 22 follow-up patients survived with recovery from symptoms and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I-II. In 10 patients with non-giant CAEs undergoing closure of fistula alone, favorable in-hospital outcomes were recorded, but residual fistula (one patient) and acute inferior wall myocardial infarction related to intracoronary thrombosis (one patient) were observed at follow-up. In 11 patients with giant CAEs undergoing aneurysm resection plus distal bypass grafting at the time of closure of fistula, favorable in-hospital outcomes and encouraging midterm results were recorded. Additionally, in 3 patients with giant CAEs undergoing closure of fistula plus aneurysmal plication, adverse events occurred, including surgical death related to rupture of the ectatic segment (one patient), perioperative myocardial infarction caused by acute thromboembolism (one patient), nonfatal inferior wall myocardial infarction related to intracoronary thrombosis (one patient) at follow-up. Conclusion: Individualized surgical approaches based on the size and the location of ectatic coronary artery as well as fistula should be offered to symptomatic patients with CAE combining CCAF.

Keywords

Coronary artery ectasia; congenital coronary artery fistula; surgical approach; giant coronary artery ectasia

Cite This Article

Wang, Y., Yang, Y., Xia, L., Ding, W., Ji, Q. et al. (2021). Surgical Correction of Coronary Artery Ectasia Combining Congenital Coronary Artery Fistula. Congenital Heart Disease, 16(1), 95–106.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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