Vol.24, No.1, 2022, pp.13-24, doi:10.32604/IJMHP.2021.017660
OPEN ACCESS
ARTICLE
Meeting 24-h Movement Guidelines is Related to Better Academic Achievement: Findings from the YRBS 2019 Cycle
  • Shaoying Liu1,2,#, Qian Yu3,#, Md Mahbub Hossain4, Scott Doig5, Ran Bao6, Yaping Zhao7, Jin Yan8,*, Xun Luo3, Jiaxuan Yang3, Arthur F. Kramer9,10, Liye Zou3
1 College of Sports Science, Haikou University of Economics, Haikou, China
2 College of Sports Science, Jishou University, Jishou, China
3 Exercise Psychophysiology Laboratory, Institute of KEEP Collaborative Innovation, School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, China
4 Department of Health Promotion and Community Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, USA
5 College of Education and Health Professions, Limestone University, South Carolina, USA
6 School of Physical Education and Sport Training, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China
7 The library of Shandong University of Sport, Shandong, China
8 Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Education, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
9 Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA
10 Canter for Cognitive & Brain Health, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA
# Equally contributed to this manuscript
* Corresponding Author:Jin Yan. Email:
Received 26 May 2021; Accepted 15 August 2021; Issue published 20 December 2021
Abstract
This research is designed to investigate the relationship between the 24-h movement guidelines (24-HMG) and self-reported academic achievement (AA) using nationally representative data derived from the 2019 U.S. National Youth Risk Behaviour Survey. A multiple-stage cluster sampling procedure has been adopted to ensure a representative sample (N = 9127 adolescents; mean age = 15.7 years old; male% = 49.8%). Logistic regression has been adopted to obtain the odds ratio (OR) regarding the associations between adherence to 24-HMG and AA while controlling for ethnicity, body mass index, sex and age. The prevalence of meeting the 24-h movement guidelines in isolation and combination varied greatly (physical activity = 23.3%, screen time = 32.5%, sleep = 22.3%, and 24-HMG = 2.8%), while the percentage of highest-class AA was 42.5%. Compared with the situation when none of 24-HMG is met, the achievement of any of the combined guidelines (except for meeting the physical activity guidelines) was significantly associated with higher odds of achieving first-class AA. Meeting the sleep guideline had 1.42 times increased likelihood to achieve highest-class AA as compared with not meeting the sleep guideline. Meeting screen time guidelines and physical activity guidelines, respectively, were 1.32 and 1.13 times more likely to report first-class AA; but meeting the guidelines of physical activity was not significantly related to AA. Meeting the 24-HMG had the highest odds of achieving first-class AA (OR = 2.01, 95%CI: 1.47– 2.73). In both sexes, adolescents who met 24-HMG self-reported better AA (boys OR = 2.05, 95%CI: 1.34–3.15; girls OR = 2.26, 95%CI: 1.36–3.76). Significant relationships were observed in adolescents from 9–10th grade, but not higher grades. Our research findings suggest that optimal movement behaviours can be seen as an important This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. DOI: 10.32604/IJMHP.2021.017660 ARTICLE Tech Science Press Published Online: 26 October 2021 element to better academic achievement among U.S. adolescents. Future studies can adopt our discoveries to promote adolescents’ academic achievement through implementing optimal 24-h movement behaviour patterns.
Keywords
Sedentary behaviour; physical activity; sleep; academic performance; high school students; U.S
Cite This Article
Liu, S., Yu, Q., Hossain, M. M., Doig, S., Bao, R. et al. (2022). Meeting 24-h Movement Guidelines is Related to Better Academic Achievement: Findings from the YRBS 2019 Cycle. International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 24(1), 13–24.
Citations
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.